assamdiabetes.com

LOADING
PREV
NEXT
http://assamdiabetes.com/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/472216saki.jpg
http://assamdiabetes.com/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/839234risk.jpg
http://assamdiabetes.com/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/716393action.jpg
http://assamdiabetes.com/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/631599pen.jpg
http://assamdiabetes.com/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/214631insulin.jpg
http://assamdiabetes.com/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/711349type2.jpg

What Is Diabetes?

  • Diabetes Overview
  • Risk Factors for Diabetes
  • Taking Action Against Dia…
  • How is diabetes treated?
  • Diabetes Treatments
  • Medications for type 2 di…

Diabetes Overview

  Diabetes is a disorder that affects the way the body uses food for energy. Normally, the sugar we take in is digested and broken down to a simple sugar,

Find more

Risk Factors for Diabetes

There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Some of them come from our family history and genetics and so are with us always, but some can be turned

Find more

Taking Action Against Diabetes

When someone has any of the risk factors for diabetes, prediabetes testing is recommended. The main tests are the fasting plasma glucose test and the oral glucose tolerance test, although

Find more

How is diabetes treated?

The major goal in treating diabetes is to minimize any elevation of blood sugar (glucose) without causing abnormally low levels of blood sugar.

Find more

Diabetes Treatments

Diabetes is a complicated disease. It can affect many areas of your body as well as many areas of your life. Treatments for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes

Find more

Medications for type 2 diabetes

t's important to remember that if a drug can provide more than one benefit (lower blood sugar and have a beneficial effect on cholesterol, for example), it should be preferred.

Find more

Announcement : NIDAN a Medico Social NGO shall support the ADF for all its social activities unitedly. Gen secretary ADF and Chairman

NIDAAN


Our sister NGO

NIDAAN involved in medical and sociocultural activities in Upper Assam.

Members of ADF completed their earlier research projects and published their works in national and international journals. Celebrating world Diabetes Day every year and other health care activities in collaboration with NIDAAN.

Members of NIDAAN supported a research methodology workshop on 24th and 25th April in Dibrugarh.

Address:

Satsang Vihar Road, Seujpur

Dibrugarh - 786001

Diabetes Overview

E-mail Print PDF

The Balance of Glucose and Insulin:
Diabetes is a disorder that affects the way the body uses food for energy. Normally, the sugar we take in is digested and broken down to a simple sugar, known as glucose. The glucose then circulates in the blood where it waits to enter cells to be used as fuel. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps move the glucose into cells. A healthy pancreas adjusts the amount of insulin based on the level of glucose. But, if one have diabetes, this process breaks down, and blood sugar levels become too high.
There are two main types of full-blown diabetes. People with Type 1 diabetes are completely unable to produce insulin. People with Type 2 diabetes can produce insulin, but their cells don't respond to it. In either case, the glucose can't move into the cells and blood glucose levels can become high. Over time, these high glucose levels can cause serious complications.
Pre-Diabetes:
Pre-diabetes means that the cells in the body are becoming resistant to insulin or the pancreas is not producing as much insulin as required. The blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be called diabetes. This is also known as "impaired fasting glucose" or "impaired glucose tolerance". A diagnosis of pre-diabetes is a warning sign that diabetes will develop later. The good news: one can prevent the development of Type 2 diabetes by losing weight, making changes in the diet and exercising.
What is Pre-Diabetes?

Type 1 Diabetes:
A person with Type 1 diabetes can't make any insulin. Type 1 most often occurs before age 30, but may strike at any age. Type 1 can be caused by a genetic disorder. The origins of Type 1 are not fully understood, and there are several theories. But all of the possible causes still have the same end result: The pancreas produces very little or no insulin anymore. Frequent insulin injections are needed for Type 1.

Type 2 Diabetes:
A person with Type 2 diabetes has adequate insulin, but the cells have become resistant to it. Type 2 usually occurs in adults over 35 years old, but can affect anyone, including children. More than 96 percent of all diabetes cases in India are Type 2. Why? It's a lifestyle disease, triggered by obesity, a lack of exercise, increased age and to some degree, genetic predisposition.

Gestational Diabetes:
Gestational diabetes (GD) affects about 4 percent of all pregnant women. It usually appears during the second trimester and disappears after the birth of the baby.
Like Type 1 and Type 2, your body can't use glucose effectively and blood glucose levels get too high. When GD is not controlled, complications can affect both you and your baby. Your doctor will help you work out a diet and exercise plan, and possibly medication. Having GD increases your risk for developing it again during future pregnancies and also raises your risk of Type 2 diabetes later in life.
Symptoms/Diagnosis
The symptoms of diabetes vary from type to type in some ways and are similar in others. Gestational diabetes and pre-diabetes differ from Type 1 and Type 2. Diagnosis is not always straightforward. What are the right tests required? What should you be looking for?

Diabetes Symptoms

Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes share many of the same signs and symptoms. If you notice frequent urination, excessive thirst, unusual fatigue, unexplained weight loss, numbness or tingling of the extremities, blurred vision, dry or itchy skin, recurrent infections, and cuts and bruises that take a long time to heal, you may have diabetes.
The onset of symptoms tends to be more gradual for people with type 2 diabetes than for those with type 1.
The gradual nature of prediabetes -- often a precursor of type 2 diabetes -- can disguise actual diabetic symptoms and prevent early diagnosis. As a result, it is especially important for individuals who have some diabetes risk factors to be aware of the symptoms and to watch for their appearance.
The appearance of any of these symptoms is a good reason to see a health care professional.

An estimated 42 million Indians have diabetes, but one-quarter to one-third don’t know it. How can so many individuals be unaware that they have diabetes? Certainly, one major factor is the absence of symptoms. This is a hallmark of both pre-diabetes and the early stages of type 2 diabetes.

Secured by Siteground Web Hosting